137: Documenting rapid change with Dr. Carey

  Dr. Joanna Carey  talks about her research on our home planet, Earth. She explains how the climate change we're experiencing is ten times faster than any in geologic history. We also discuss why small changes in carbon emissions today will make a huge difference to the future climate, and things everyday people can do to mitigate the damage.    Lear more about Dr. Carey’s research  here , and follow her on  twitter !

Dr. Joanna Carey talks about her research on our home planet, Earth. She explains how the climate change we're experiencing is ten times faster than any in geologic history. We also discuss why small changes in carbon emissions today will make a huge difference to the future climate, and things everyday people can do to mitigate the damage.

Lear more about Dr. Carey’s research here, and follow her on twitter!

136: Would sailboats work on Titan? With Dr. Soto

  Dr. Alejandro Soto  returns to the show to talk about how lakes on Titan and on Earth influence the nearby atmosphere. He talks about how lakes create breezes that allow for sailing on Earth, and how the situation changes on Titan.  Titan's seas reflect the sun's light.  Cassini spacecraft  photo, credit  NASA / JPL-Caltech / University of Arizona / University of Idaho .

Dr. Alejandro Soto returns to the show to talk about how lakes on Titan and on Earth influence the nearby atmosphere. He talks about how lakes create breezes that allow for sailing on Earth, and how the situation changes on Titan.

Titan's seas reflect the sun's light. Cassini spacecraft photo, credit NASA / JPL-Caltech / University of Arizona / University of Idaho.

135: Linking asteroid observations with Dr. Holman

 Dr. Matt Holman, head of the  Minor Planet Center  in Cambridge, Massachusetts, stops by to talk asteroids. The Minor Planet Center handles about a hundred thousand asteroid observations a night, from observatories all around the world. He talks about the difficulties in linking asteroid observations, and the discovery of the first interstellar asteroid, 'Oumuamua.  Image: A collage of images of the asteroid Gaspra, taken by the Galileo spacecraft.  Credit: NASA/JPL.

Dr. Matt Holman, head of the Minor Planet Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts, stops by to talk asteroids. The Minor Planet Center handles about a hundred thousand asteroid observations a night, from observatories all around the world. He talks about the difficulties in linking asteroid observations, and the discovery of the first interstellar asteroid, 'Oumuamua.

Image: A collage of images of the asteroid Gaspra, taken by the Galileo spacecraft. Credit: NASA/JPL.

133: Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, and Mercury with Dr. Padovan

  Dr. Sebastiano Padovan  talks about the planet closest to the sun, Mercury. He compares the evolution of planets to movies, and says that understanding a planet's history from its current state is like trying to figure out the plot of an entire movie from a single snapshot. He also explains why Mercury is "a favorite" of scientists who do computational modeling.

Dr. Sebastiano Padovan talks about the planet closest to the sun, Mercury. He compares the evolution of planets to movies, and says that understanding a planet's history from its current state is like trying to figure out the plot of an entire movie from a single snapshot. He also explains why Mercury is "a favorite" of scientists who do computational modeling.

132: Introducing people to the reach of infinity with Tim Thompson

  Tim Thompson , former JPL scientist and member of the Mt. Wilson Institute Board of Trustees, talks about the Mt. Wilson Observatory. He explains why he doesn't operate the Mt. Wilson telescopes himself, and tells us why astronomers hate the twinkling of the stars. This episode was recorded on location, and Tim talks about the many public events offered at Mt. Wilson.  Learn more about Mt. Wilson and see upcoming events at  www.mtwilson.edu.    Image: 1909 image of the dome housing the 60 inch reflector telescope.

Tim Thompson, former JPL scientist and member of the Mt. Wilson Institute Board of Trustees, talks about the Mt. Wilson Observatory. He explains why he doesn't operate the Mt. Wilson telescopes himself, and tells us why astronomers hate the twinkling of the stars. This episode was recorded on location, and Tim talks about the many public events offered at Mt. Wilson.

Learn more about Mt. Wilson and see upcoming events at www.mtwilson.edu.

Image: 1909 image of the dome housing the 60 inch reflector telescope.

124: Searching Antarctica for meteorites with Dr. Cohen

  Dr. Barbara Cohen  returns to the show to talk about meteorite collecting in Antarctica. These trips, which involve weeks of camping on the ice, provide invaluable scientific samples. She talks about what it's like to search for the rocks that "don't belong" in the frozen desert.  NASA put out a great article on her work as well, read it  here ! Also check out Dr. Cohen's  Wikipedia page .

Dr. Barbara Cohen returns to the show to talk about meteorite collecting in Antarctica. These trips, which involve weeks of camping on the ice, provide invaluable scientific samples. She talks about what it's like to search for the rocks that "don't belong" in the frozen desert.

NASA put out a great article on her work as well, read it here! Also check out Dr. Cohen's Wikipedia page.

121: Solar storms with Dr. Janvier

  Dr. Miho Janvier  talks about her work studying solar storms, and tells us about the ways these storms have impacted humans in the past. She explains why they are challenging to model and says why she's interested in "garbage" data from planetary missions.  Folllow Dr. Janvier on  Twitter , and watch her  TED talk !   Image : Miho Janvier speaks at TEDGlobal 2017, Arusha, Tanzania. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED

Dr. Miho Janvier talks about her work studying solar storms, and tells us about the ways these storms have impacted humans in the past. She explains why they are challenging to model and says why she's interested in "garbage" data from planetary missions.

Folllow Dr. Janvier on Twitter, and watch her TED talk!

Image: Miho Janvier speaks at TEDGlobal 2017, Arusha, Tanzania. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED