98: A place on Earth as dry as Mars with Dr. Azua-Bustos

Dr. Armando Azua-Bustos talks about how he discovered the driest place on Earth— a region in the Atacama Desert not far from where he grew up. He explains how he collects and studies microbial life that live in these extremely dry regions. Learn more about his research here, or visit the webpage of the Centro De Astrobiología.

Dr. Armando Azua-Bustos talks about how he discovered the driest place on Earth— a region in the Atacama Desert not far from where he grew up. He explains how he collects and studies microbial life that live in these extremely dry regions.

Learn more about his research here, or visit the webpage of the Centro De Astrobiología.

94: Seven hundred new craters on Mars with Dr. Daubar

Dr. Ingrid Daubar stops by to talk about HiRISE, a camera on a Mars-orbiting spacecraft that takes amazing images of the Martian surface. She explains how she uses these images to search for fresh craters, and how you (yes you!) suggest areas of the planet for this camera to image. (Correction to episode: Mars’ atmosphere is 0.6% that ofEarth, not 6%). HiWish public suggestion page!

Dr. Ingrid Daubar stops by to talk about HiRISE, a camera on a Mars-orbiting spacecraft that takes amazing images of the Martian surface. She explains how she uses these images to search for fresh craters, and how you (yes you!) suggest areas of the planet for this camera to image. (Correction to episode: Mars’ atmosphere is 0.6% that ofEarth, not 6%).

HiWish public suggestion page!

91: Tectonic hazard on Phobos with Dr. Curren

Dr. Ivy Curren talks about Mars’ moon Phobos, and how grooves on its surface indicate that the interior may be fractured. This small, mysterious moon is covered in faults, making it a dicey place for future missions to land. Enhanced-color image of Phobos, taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / University of Arizona.

Dr. Ivy Curren talks about Mars’ moon Phobos, and how grooves on its surface indicate that the interior may be fractured. This small, mysterious moon is covered in faults, making it a dicey place for future missions to land.

Enhanced-color image of Phobos, taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / University of Arizona.

Bonus episode: I wrote a book!

As part of the 2016 TED Fellows class, I got to meet cool people and I got to talk about asteroids. My TED talk is now online (watch it here!) and the companion book, “Asteroid Hunters”, by me, is now available in the US, UK, Canada, Australia, and India. There’s also e-book and audiobook versions. This bonus episode contains an excerpt from “Asteroid Hunters”. “Asteroid Hunters"  is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, IndieBound, and as an iBook. An audiobook version will also be available.

As part of the 2016 TED Fellows class, I got to meet cool people and I got to talk about asteroids. My TED talk is now online (watch it here!) and the companion book, “Asteroid Hunters”, by me, is now available in the US, UK, Canada, Australia, and India. There’s also e-book and audiobook versions. This bonus episode contains an excerpt from “Asteroid Hunters”.

“Asteroid Hunters"  is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, IndieBound, and as an iBook. An audiobook version will also be available.

87: Visions of interstellar travel with Dr. Hurt

Dr. Robert Hurt returns to the show to talk about artistic depictions of interstellar travel. We discuss the images of the seven-planet TRAPPIST-1 system he and Tim Pyle created— images that graced the cover of Nature and the front page of the New York Times. We also talk about Star Trek: The Next Generation, and what that TV show got right (and wrong) about the visuals of cruising through outer space.

Dr. Robert Hurt returns to the show to talk about artistic depictions of interstellar travel. We discuss the images of the seven-planet TRAPPIST-1 system he and Tim Pyle created— images that graced the cover of Nature and the front page of the New York Times. We also talk about Star Trek: The Next Generation, and what that TV show got right (and wrong) about the visuals of cruising through outer space.

85: Risk, hazard, and threat: the importance of language with Dr. Billings

Dr Linda Billings talks about the importance of clear communication across the expert/non-expert boundary. She describes the difference between the words “risk”, “hazard” and “threat,” as applied to near-Earth objects and gives advice to scientists who want to communicate their research accurately. Communicate with Linda on Twitter.

Dr Linda Billings talks about the importance of clear communication across the expert/non-expert boundary. She describes the difference between the words “risk”, “hazard” and “threat,” as applied to near-Earth objects and gives advice to scientists who want to communicate their research accurately.

Communicate with Linda on Twitter.

84: Saturn’s siren song with Dr. Burton

Dr. Marcia Burton stops by the show to talk about radio waves from Saturn, as measured by the Cassini Spacecraft. We listen to some audio clips, and she explains why it is so difficult to measure the length of Saturn’s day. Links to the spectograms associated with the audio clips ([1],[2]) on the show. Link to NPR story on Chronos String Quartet peice inspired by Saturn radio emissions.

Dr. Marcia Burton stops by the show to talk about radio waves from Saturn, as measured by the Cassini Spacecraft. We listen to some audio clips, and she explains why it is so difficult to measure the length of Saturn’s day.

Links to the spectograms associated with the audio clips ([1],[2]) on the show.

Link to NPR story on Chronos String Quartet peice inspired by Saturn radio emissions.

83: Why we archive with Dr. Rebull

Dr. Luisa Rebull explains why it is vital to archive astronomical images. NASA archives, such as the ones at IPAC, are accessible everyone on Earth at no cost. Luisa also describes how you can take a tour through archived data via the Dustier, Messier, Messier Marathon. Links: IPAC’s Finder Chart. Dustier, Messier, Messier Marathon The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP) Image: Robert Hurt

Dr. Luisa Rebull explains why it is vital to archive astronomical images. NASA archives, such as the ones at IPAC, are accessible everyone on Earth at no cost. Luisa also describes how you can take a tour through archived data via the Dustier, Messier, Messier Marathon.


Links:
IPAC’s Finder Chart.
Dustier, Messier, Messier Marathon
The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP)

Image: Robert Hurt

80: Places where people can have adventures with Br. Consolmagno

Brother Guy Consolmagno shares a Coke and talks about the Vatican Observatory, a discovery that got him in trouble with the Voyager team, and why being next to a dairy farm was convenient when he wanted to measure the properties of meteorites.

Brother Guy Consolmagno shares a Coke and talks about the Vatican Observatory, a discovery that got him in trouble with the Voyager team, and why being next to a dairy farm was convenient when he wanted to measure the properties of meteorites.

True color image of Jupiter's moon Io, taken by the Galileo Spacecraft. Image- NASA/JPL-Caltech.

True color image of Jupiter's moon Io, taken by the Galileo Spacecraft. Image- NASA/JPL-Caltech.